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“Watch out for ‘rigid’ and ‘devout’ seminarians…”


The mistake the Franciscans of the Immaculate made was thinking they could continue to play Catholic within the structures of NuChurch.

I regret that things have come to such a pass in the Church that Catholicism, openly practiced in groups, is no longer tolerated. For a long time we could get away with maintaining the idea in our heads that the structural Church was a “big tent” in which the “chosen path” of one person was just as “valid” as any other. Under JPII we could even convince ourselves, (as long as we didn’t look too closely – and remembering that this was well before the innernet) that the ancient Faith was being restored and we just had to wait.

It’s pretty clear now that those days are behind us. We can play Catholic in the structural Church as individuals, but more and more I expect we will be like Christians in Saudi Arabia who have to be extremely careful to keep our Rosaries to ourselves.

I think the comment on YT under the video above from some guy identifying himself as “a liberal Catholic Franciscan” about sums up the whole error:

“I got to know some of the men in this Order over a number of years, I was deeply impressed with their prayer life and devotion, a great devotion to the Church and to Mary. I did however find them to be at times a little extreme in there own personal views of where the church is currently in both its theology and liturgy. Yet, all said, a bunch of great men,yes, a little obsessive, but who isn’t. Blessings to all of them that follow this path. I myself as a Liberal Catholic Franciscan have chosen another path, no less, no greater, just little different. Yet, still devotional and loving. Blessings. Brother Francis Mary. The Franciscan’s of the Cross. An Australian Order.”

Yes, that was the attitude. The people of a traditional mindset were barely and condescendingly tolerated on the theory that one “path” is as good as another. Some people tend to be “a little obsessive” but I guess that’s OK for them. And under this rubric of indifference Traditional Catholicism managed to survive and even grow in pockets here and there. The true Faith is like a mint plant; once it is allowed out of its container it won’t take long before it takes over the whole garden. Therefore, the bishops and Vatican under the last two popes were careful to ensure that it was always strictly contained. Still, you could find it if you really wanted it. You had to be “a little obsessive” but it was out there.

But with Francis’s latest comments on his intentions for seminaries, I think we can see that certain predictions are being brought into reality.

“There are often young men who are psychologically unstable without knowing it and who look for strong structures to support them. For some it is the police or the army but for others it is the clergy,” the pope said. However, the pope said he personally finds it worrisome when a priest takes pride in being extremely devout. “When a youngster is too rigid, too fundamentalist, I don’t feel confident (about him). Behind it there is something he himself does not understand. Keep your eyes open!”

“What will happen? Many Catholics are making the mistake of thinking this is an attack on marriage. No. This is an assault on the very foundations of the Faith itself: the Eucharist and the priesthood.

Once this principle is in place… nothing will survive. Not the teachings on the sanctity of life, the Marian dogmas, popular piety or devotions or any of the practices, traditions, doctrines or dogmas that form the deposit of the Faith itself.

The priesthood would be the first relic of the old Faith to be effectively destroyed. A decision to allow divorced and civilly “remarried” Catholics to receive Holy Communion would, for example, logically spell the end of the return to orthodoxy among young priests and seminarians…

What has been the most outstanding characteristic of this new breed of orthodox priest? Why, reverence for the Holy Eucharist of course. … And none of those men will be willing to commit the sacrilegious act of allowing public unrepentant adulterers to receive the Body and Blood of Christ. Therefore, these priests who are the least bit unwilling, the tiniest bit hesitant to go along with the new orders could not possibly be allowed to carry on in ministry.

Even for parishes to have different Masses would be unacceptable; the idea of a separate Mass for unrepentant public adulterers would be as offensive as refusing Communion in the first place. No, it would be impossible to maintain such a “two-tier” system in which some priests willing to commit sacrilege could work side-by-side with those who refuse to abandon Christ.

In addition, no seminarian who indicated any hesitation on this “merciful” new practice of “tolerance” for “second marriages” could be allowed to be ordained. The whole trend of more orthodox and devout priests and seminarians, the “JPII” and Ratzinger generations, would come to an instant, screeching halt.

~

What were the specific areas where the “conservative” revival were most apparent? What is the one thing that nearly all of us have said, like a slogan or a mantra to make ourselves feel better? “The seminaries have been ‘cleaned up’ and are no longer ‘pink palaces’. Young seminarians are all of the ‘JPII and Benedict’ mould and one day will be the priests and bishops who will restore the Faith. We just have to wait.”

One thing, however, continues to be a relief to me. We are no longer playing the ridiculous old game of “Well your path is as good as mine, each to his own.” The powers in the Church have finally dropped that absurd facade. It is now their way or nothing. I’d say this is an improvement.

~

23 thoughts on ““Watch out for ‘rigid’ and ‘devout’ seminarians…””

  1. Hilary White says:

    Buddy, I dunno who you are, but you’re boring the shit out of me. This isn’t the Remnant and I’m not nearly as patient, polite or forebearing as Mike is.

    For myself, I’ve got a few rules for commenters: no verbal abuse (an exception reserved to me, of course) no threats, no anti-semitism, and no advertising. And no whining.

    No one around here is interested in your little beefs.

    Beat it.

  2. @FMShyanguya says:

    To your question “Please forgive my ignorance, but how could a Cardinal be a member of the CFR? Did PJPII know about Bernardin and the CFR?” over at the Remnant Newspaper, I cannot reply there because I have been banned. My response is https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/db1c19f27b7ab2d61bca0f49e2e2567b8037535a9aa9cdcd02e115ad533a6926.jpg “I am just discovering these things myself and of course I cannot speak for Pope St. John Paul II or the Vatican [the infiltration is also there].”

  3. HudsonLink says:

    “I find it worrisome when priests take pride in being extremely devout.” Pope Francis, see above. I thought priests were supposed to be as devout as the were capable of being.

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  6. Margaret says:

    Now if he had actually said that, the world’s collective ears would have popped up and the latent sensus Fidei in NOCs would be awakened.

  7. Margaret says:

    I agree with you 1000%.

  8. Margaret says:

    I hope you’re right. We still need to pray for Bishop Fellay and the other SSPX bishops and priests. Pope Francis decreed that people could be absolved by SSPX priests during the Year of Mercy. Well, the faithful who attend SSPX Masses already know that.

    The SSPX needs to be very careful.

  9. john says:

    This Pope is creepy, for sure

  10. john says:

    Support the SSPX seminary project. Go online and Google “SSPX New Seminary Project” – it’s an incredible project. As big as it will be, it will be almost full! They are the only assurance of Catholicism surviving without compromise. Support them!

  11. john says:

    Looks like nothing to worry about there. Go to the SSPX website, read Bishop Fellay’s commentary on the Synod. They also re-posted the 1974 declaration of Archbishop Lefebvre to resist modernist Rome. Pretty sure that has killed any desire for “dialogue,” as far as Francis is concerned. I believe alot of what Francis is criticizing with regard to orthodoxy among priests, is in fact directed toward them (SSPX). He (Francis) probably expected them to remain silent in lieu his earlier oliversions branch extended in this “Year of Mercy.”

  12. Aaron Baugher says:

    Yes, I don’t think he’ll get that far. In a way, the Muslim invasion may save us. As people turn to the Church for leadership against their latest global jihad, I expect Francis will continue to double-down on the “religion of peace” and “those aren’t real Muslims” talk and recommend nothing more meaningful than more inter-religious dialogue.

    People may be able to accept a pope who doesn’t defend doctrine, but I think they’ll have a harder time accepting one who actively tries to prevent the defense of their children’s lives.

  13. @FMShyanguya says:

    What a stirring video that pierces the soul. Thank you!

  14. @FMShyanguya says:

    “If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything.

  15. Aloysius Gonzaga says:

    I find the Pope’s own warning to be “creepy.” He is insinuating that there is something insidious about pious seminarians. We have come to expect this Pope to have a bad case of verbal diarrhea and this is no exception.

  16. Carolyn C says:

    It’s an “irregular situation” for the NGO, not the Mystical Body of Christ. Jesus said: “Have you not read what David did when he became hungry, he and his companions, 4how he entered the house of God, and they ate the consecrated bread, which was not lawful for him to eat nor for those with him, but for the priests alone?””Or have you not read in the Law, that on the Sabbath the priests in the temple break the Sabbath and are innocent?”

  17. Tom Edwards says:

    Where did Pope Francis say that “devout”, holy priests scare him? The reporter used the word “devout”. Pope Francis never said that devout and holy priests scare him.

  18. Chloe says:

    I think that’s his aim. But 20 years from now I reckon the whole world will have realised the appalling damage he has done, not only to the Church but to the world.

  19. Ab illo bene dicáris says:

    More like, “rigid little monsters with Promethean neo-Pelagian aspirations to becoming butterfly-priest functionaries!”

  20. Lynne says:

    Thank goodness the SSPX, FSSP and ICKSP seminarians are being properly formed. I hope I am wrong but if this situation (the kabuki dance around who can receive Holy Communion) continues much farther, the FSSP and ICKSP priests may no longer be tolerated in dioceses. I agree, the SSPX should stay where they are.

  21. Netmilsmom says:

    I hate to say it but unless the Vatican is coming to the SSPX with plans to give them their own rite, they should sit tight in their “irregular situation”.

  22. Aaron Baugher says:

    Francis sometimes doesn’t seem very bright, but he’s very good at framing his Modernist language to allow for differing interpretations. Those who want to support him will latch onto the word “pride” in his quote and say, “Well, he has a point. ‘Too much pride is a vice, and not something we want in priests. What’s wrong with saying that?” Out of context, it doesn’t seem so bad. It’s only when you put it in the context of everything else he says and does that you can see clearly what he means by it.

    If he gets his way, then 10-20 years from now, when the seminaries are back to the condition of the 1970s, no one will be able to point to this quote or any other specific statement from him that brought it about, just like last time. But the progression will have been no less sure.

  23. A. Christian says:

    It’s funny that this is happening. Three years into choosing to go into Catholic education because it is “Catholic” and not secular as I was working and bam, please stop being Catholic in the Catholic schools please.

    Jesus I Trust in You!

  24. Guest says:

    Principles are something you hold rigidly to. A man who doesn’t hold his principles rigidly doesn’t believe in them.

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